Blog: “Please explain Interventional Orthopedics?”

Dr Sheinkop: “Five years ago, after 37 years of performing hip and knee replacements at a major medical center in Chicago, where I served as director of the Joint Replacement program, I exchanged the scalpel for a needle. Having achieved my surgical goals, I elected to help pioneer the emerging subspecialty of interventional orthopedics, introducing clinical research so that regenerative medicine in the musculoskeletal system would be evidence based. Instead of a long incision, lengthy rehabilitation, potential major complications, and potential infection, I use bone marrow and growth factor concentrate through a needle to help a patient reduce or eliminate pain from an arthritic joint, improve motion and increase functional capacity.”

Blog: “Why did you take this route?”

Dr Sheinkop: “My clinical joint replacement research initiatives, wherein every patient on whom I had operated was closely monitored and followed, made me realize that patients under 60 were too prone to early revision surgery; that is a repeat replacement in a relatively short time. I became aware of the potential of the stem cells and growth factors in bone marrow concentrate to assist a patient with grades two and three arthritis of a major joint in postponing, perhaps avoiding a major joint replacement. As well, for older patients with grade four osteoarthritis who have too many co-morbidities and aren’t safe surgical risks, Bone Marrow Concentrate is a reasonable option.

Blog: “What evidence have you accumulated?”

Dr Sheinkop: “80% of our patients are very satisfied after four years. At the knee, only 7 % have gone on to have a joint replacement. At the hip, that number is about the same. I now have about four percent of patients who have undergone or are scheduled to undergo a repeat Bone Marrow Concentrate procedure after three to four years. Equally important is the comparison of activities after a Bone Marrow/ Growth Factor intervention versus a Total Joint Replacement. I have arthritic knees, grade three. I underwent an intervention on my left side 18 months ago. Last weekend, I went fly fishing for two days in Southwest Wisconsin walking along the creeks, at times in the spring creeks. This week, I am going skiing in Vail with my family. None of this would be possible with a joint replacement.”

Blog: “This is fascinating information; so much so that I want to continue this interview into next week. I want to ask you in particular about the acetabular labrum which seems to be receiving all kinds or attention, arthroscopic knee meniscectomy in the presence of arthritis, non-surgical alternatives for a torn ACL, and subchondroplasty”