We now are approaching five-year outcomes regarding the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate for Osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, shoulder and ankle. Bone Marrow contains Adult Mesenchymal Stem (MSC) cells and Growth Factors. In the beginning, the entire informed consent process focused on the MSC in bone marrow as the agent responsible for diminishing pain, improving motion, stopping, at times reversing the progression of osteoarthritis, and potentially regenerating the joint itself. Now we know that equally important to the MSC are the growth factors produced and stored in the bone marrow. Some of the key proteins (Growth factors) include Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protein (IRAP), Alpha-2-Macroglobulin (A2M), fibrinogen, PDGF, VEGF, and TGF-B to name a few.

The reason we directed our clinical initiatives to Bone Marrow Concentrate is that while Amniotic Fluid contains Hyaluronic Acid, once harvested, sterilized and fast thawed for clinical application, there are no living stem cells left, so Amniotic Fluid Concentrate has no regenerative potential. When it comes to Adipose Derived Stem Cells, in order to liberate the stem cell from the adipocyte, an enzyme, collagenase must be employed. The latter is not approved by the FDA. Additionally, there is no evidence of Growth Factor content in adipose derived tissue.

While I have blogged about the superiority of Bone Marrow Concentrate over all other non-surgical approaches for arthritis, the introduction of the intraosseous adjunct, subchondroplasty, is resulting in even superior outcomes when compared to those who were treated prior to this contemporary version of Cellular Orthopedics. It has been nine months basically since I started injecting Bone Marrow Concentrate into the marrow adjacent to the joint in addition to the intraarticular approach. We already are seeing a better outcome in those who availed themselves of the Intraosseous adjunct. Up until eight weeks ago, my ability to offer contemporary and improved treatment options was limited by preexisting contractual obligations; but now unrestricted, I have expanded my scope of offerings including elevation of subchondroplasty from a clinical trial status to usual and customary adjunct standard of practice option. As well, I now offer an increased opportunity for participation in other clinical trials for the arthritic joint when a patient meets obligatory inclusion criteria determined by the trial sponsor.

If you want to postpone, perhaps avoid a major surgical replacement for an arthritic joint, call for a consultation    847 390 7666

You may visit my web site at IlCellulartherapy.com where you may watch my webinar.