The March 2018, edition of Consumer Reports includes an article written by Jenseen Interlandi that is worth the read for both what it does say and the questions it raises. I welcome the critical review of Stem Cell Therapy whenever an article appears because I too am critical of the charlatans, camp followers and those fleecing the public. In the Interlandi article, the reader immediately finds one such example of a so-called Institute in Tampa, Florida victimizing those with chronic pulmonary diseases; but you don’t have to travel to Florida to find such practices as were reported on by Fox 32’s Sylvia Perez in her investigation featured Monday, January 29. If you missed it, all you need to do is click on the hi lighted below:

http://www.fox32chicago.com/health/customers-warn-doctors-are-scamming-patients-with-fake-stem-cell-claims

Equally egregious are the in your face, regularly appearing ads in our newspapers for stem cell treatment via amniotic fluid. If there were viable stem cells in amniotic fluid, the non-autologous (yours to you) nature of said treatment is contrary to FDA compliance. On the other hand, repeated microscopic studies confirm that no viable stem cells are to be found in amniotic fluid once recovered by amniocentesis, sterilization, processing, freezing and eventually fast thawing for injection.

I will attempt to respond to the “Climate of Confusion” critique found as a headline inside the article. Rather than repeat the lengthy text, I assume I have piqued your curiosity and you will buy the periodical and read.  While it is true that I use patient testimonials to promote my interventions, what I do in my practice is indeed based on an increasing data base of clinical outcomes.  We practice evidence based cellular orthopedics as a result of  the largest and longest running outcomes documentation data base in regenerative medicine. On February 15, at the Interventional Orthopedics Foundation annual meeting taking place outside of Boulder, Colorado, my colleague David Karli will report on my outcomes at one year using a combined intra-articular (into the joint) and intra-osseous (into the bone adjacent to the joint) at one year and comparing the outcomes to those documented at one year following intra-articular injection alone. Patients who received the combined intervention reported an 89% average diminution of pain at one year as compared to a 40% decrease in those who underwent intra-articular Bone Marrow Concentrate intervention alone. This is one example of what may be gleaned from a data base.

In conclusion, the obvious question becomes, “How to Protect Yourself” from unscrupulous stem cell therapy? My response, call and schedule an appointment or view my website and webinar:

312-475-1893

www.Ilcellulartherapy.com

I will answer your questions, avoid hype and review the fine print with you.