Just as I cringe when a new patient announces that they have “bone on bone”, so too do I squirm when I am told by a patient “I have a torn” at times meniscus or cartilage; others, a torn rotator cuff; and then again, a torn labrum. Attention please, your X-ray or MRI image is not causing pain, the inflammation in or around your joint is the pain generator. 95% of the population over age 45 will have an abnormality interpreted by the radiologist on the report their MRI, be it of the shoulder, hip or knee. Cartilage and meniscal changes at the knee, labral tears at the hip or shoulder, and rotator cuff abnormalities are part of the attritional process; alternatively, these changes are commonly over diagnosed.

Last week, a 70-year-old woman called to schedule an appointment and indicated that she had a torn acetabular(hip) labrum diagnosed on a recent MRI. I responded, “your pain generator is arthritis unless you are a hockey goalie”. I was being a bit facetious but at the same time truthful. My 37-year experience as a reconstructive orthopedic surgeon specializing in hip and knee replacement really prepared me for this life after surgery; namely, a cellular orthopedic interventionalist.

It takes a history and hands on physical examination prior to review of images to determine what is causing a painful musculoskeletal condition. The common denominator is inflammation, not a computer image. In the case of arthritis, unless the cartilage (meniscus), labrum or rotator cuff alteration is generating mechanical problems such as weakness, locking, “clunking” or giving way, we frequently need not address the former with a maximally invasive surgical procedure; a needle will suffice and deliver the platelets, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Growth Factors and precursor cells required to address pain, improve function, increase motion, stop progression of arthritis and restore, at times regenerate the joint.

Cellular Orthopedics encompasses a full joint Preservation, Restoration and Regenerative scope of options. The notion introduced by a print media ad, that it is “one and done”, won’t help you postpone, perhaps avoid a joint replacement. In my practice, we monitor progress and intervene when necessary at five months or five years if indicated.

To learn more, visit my web site at www.SheinkopMD.com or call and schedule a consultation at (312) 475-1893